Sunday, July 15–Saturday, August 4

 Discover the music within you

 

Experience conservatory-style living with a rigorous musical schedule and opportunities to perform in an intimate, challenging, and supportive environment. The three-week course features personalized attention from celebrated faculty, many of whom are Curtis alumni, with thriving pedagogical or performance careers. 

Musicians aged 14 to 22 who have studied privately at the advanced level are welcome to apply. 

 

 

Every participant selects one area of focus:

  • Daily seminar class featuring discussions about the past and future of composition; advice from performers about how to write for their instruments; and conversations about commissions, competitions, publishing, and other issues composers face today.
  • Orchestral score study
  • A performance and recording of one of your works by Curtis musicians–unique to this program. The chamber work performed by the Curtis Summerfest faculty is written by composition participants before the start of the program. Accepted composition participants are sent specific options for instrumentation. Composers submit scores one to two weeks in advance of arrival. This chamber work will be performed by Summerfest faculty during the composition recitals in the second and third week of the program. Additional works written during the program may be seen by composition faculty during lessons and the daily seminar, and may be workshopped by peers.
  • Master class presentations of distinguished composers in a small-lecture format, with opportunities for questions and discussion. Past master class faculty have included Steven Mackey, Efstratios Minakaki, and Joan Tower. In 2017 we were honored to welcome two outstanding guest artists: Missy Mazzoli, “Brooklyn’s post-millennial Mozart” (Time Out New York); and Christopher Rouse, faculty at the Juilliard School and Peabody Institute. Master class faculty for 2018 will be announced soon.

 

  • Weekly private lessons
  • Weekly conducting seminar featuring discussions about best practices and score study, led by the week’s faculty conductor
  • Orchestral score study
  • An opportunity to rehearse an ensemble of program participants, conduct in performance, and receive a video recording—unique to this program

 

  • Chamber music rehearsals and coachings
  • Piano four-hands rehearsals and coachings
  • Weekend recitals (performers are selected weekly by faculty members; each pianist performs at least once with their piano-duo partner and at least once in a mixed chamber ensemble)
  • A few pianists accepted to the Young Artist Summer Program will be selected to play at a master class. The pre-selected participants will be contacted prior to the program with details. All participants are required to observe master classes specific to their instrument, and are also welcome to observe master classes for other instruments. 2018 master class faculty will be announced soon. In 2017 we were honored to welcome the following outstanding guest artists to lead piano master classes:
    • Cecile Licad (Piano ’78), prolific international performer
    • Anna Polonsky (Piano ’99), faculty at Vassar College and a Steinway artist
  • All instrumentalists who are accepted to the Young Artist Summer Program are welcome, but not required, to compete in the Concerto Competition.

Those interested in competing will be asked to submit a video recording of one movement of a standard concerto about six weeks before the start of the program. You may use a score for the video recording, but should you be selected to participate in the final round, your performance must be from memory. For the video, an accompanist is encouraged but not required. A panel of faculty judges will select ten finalists to go forward to the final round. Finalists will be notified by e-mail a week before the program begins. Each finalist will have ten minutes in front of a live jury during the first week of the program. Three prize-winners will be chosen. The first-prize winner will perform on one of the final concerts.

 

  • Weekly private lessons
  • Chamber music rehearsals and coachings
  • Orchestra: nightly rehearsals and weekly recitals, with the opportunity to work with three different conductors
  • Sectional coachings of orchestral repertoire
  • Studio classes, varying by instrument
  • Performances: Each week, participants are nominated by faculty to perform at the weekly chamber recital. All participants will perform at least one movement of a chamber piece at least once during the course of the program.
  • A few instrumentalists who apply and are accepted to the Young Artist Summer Program will be selected to play at a master class.

The pre-selected participants will be contacted prior to the program with details. All participants are required to observe any master classes specific to their instrument, and are also welcome to observe master classes for other instruments. Master classes for 2018 will be announced soon. In 2017 we were honored to welcome the following outstanding guest artists to lead the master classes for orchestral instruments:

    • Violin: Ani Kavafian, prolific soloist, faculty at Yale University
    • Viola: Roberto Díaz (Viola ’84), president and faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music
    • Double bass: Harold Robinson, faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music and principal double bass of the Philadelphia Orchestra
    • Flute: Tara O’Connor, faculty at Bard College, Purchase College conservatories, Manhattan School of Music, and Royal Conservatory of Music (Toronto), and recipient of Avery Fisher Career Grant
    • Bassoon: William Short (Bassoon ’10), faculty at the Juilliard School and principal bassoon of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra
    • Horn: David Cooper (Horn ’04), principal horn of the Berlin Philharmonic
    • Trumpet: David Bilger, faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music and Temple University and principal trumpet of the Philadelphia Orchestra
    • Percussion: Matthew Duvall, percussionist of leading contemporary ensemble Eighth Blackbird
    • Percussion: Don Liuzzi, faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music and principal timpani of the Philadelphia Orchestra
  • All instrumentalists who are accepted to the Young Artist Summer Program are welcome, but not required, to compete in the Concerto Competition.

Those interested in competing will be asked to submit a video recording of one movement of a standard concerto about six weeks before the start of the program. You may use a score for the video recording, but should you be selected to participate in the final round, your performance must be from memory. For the video, an accompanist is encouraged but not required. A panel of faculty judges will select ten finalists to go forward to the final round. Finalists will be notified by e-mail a week before the program begins. Each finalist will have ten minutes in front of a live jury during the first week of the program. Three prize-winners will be chosen. The first-prize winner will perform on one of the final concerts.

 

 

 

The whole program, about 100 students, comes together through:

    • Daily all-program choir led by Patrick Kreeger
    • Eight sessions of musical studies class
    • One session of rhythm class led by percussion faculty members, Mari Yoshinaga and Garrett Arney
    • Presentations and Q&As with guest artists

 


Instrumentalists and Conductors

  • October 2017: Applications available
  • January 31, noon EST: Applications for all instrumental and conducting participants due. An additional $35 late fee will be assessed on applications submitted after this date.
  • February: Notification of admission and financial aid status provided to all instrumental and conducting applicants who submitted by January 31
  • March 1: Payment due*

*Accepted applicants may inquire about installment plans.

 

Composers

  • October 2017: Applications available
  • January 31, noon EST: Composers who apply by this date save $35 on application fee
  • March 15, noon EST: All composition applications due
  • Early April: Notification of admission and financial aid status provided to all composition applicants
  • April 20, noon EST: Payment due
  • Application Fee: $65 / $100*
  • Tuition: $3,500
  • Housing and Dining: $2,650**

*Application fee: $65 before noon EST on January 31, 2018; $100 (after January 31). Applicants also submit a $25 transaction fee.

**Includes three unlimited meals per day, housing in Lenfest Hall, and residential activities. Does not include travel or medical care. Local musicians are welcome to commute.

Acceptance to the Young Artist Summer Program is need-blind. Limited financial assistance from Curtis Summerfest may be available, but is not guaranteed. Notice of financial assistance awards will be included in the acceptance status e-mail.

Students and parents are also urged to seek financial assistance from local sources: self-organized fundraisers; school music organizations; county, state, or national music education organizations; youth orchestras and bands; music clubs; service clubs (Rotary, Kiwanas, etc.); businesses; local churches; and foundations.

 

Merit-based financial assistance

To apply for merit-based financial assistance, see section 4 (Scholarship) of the online application. Answer “Yes” to the first question in this section (“Are you applying for merit-based financial assistance?”).

No further action is required to be considered for merit-based financial assistance.

 

Need-based financial assistance

To apply for need-based financial assistance, upload the following to section 4 (Scholarship) of the online application.

U.S. citizens:

      • The Young Artist Summer Program 2018 Financial Assistance Application, completed and signed (download the PDF here).
      • All parent/guardian 2016 tax returns
      • All parent/guardian 2017 W2 forms

International applicants:

      • The Young Artist Summer Program 2018 Financial Assistance Application, completed and signed (download the PDF here).
      • Copies of all parent/guardians’ most recent bank statements, in English or with translation provided
      • Letters, in English or with translation provided, from all parent/guardian employers stating total wages earned from January 2016–December 2016.

The majority of YASP applicants are dependent upon parent or guardians. If you are an older applicant aged 21 or 22 and are financially independent, income documentation should be your own.